USA My Thesaurus

USA My Thesaurus

MY_THESAURUS

SUGGESTIONS FOR USING ‘MY THESAURUS’
 

Cover:  Show students the cover of MY THESAURUS

Ask what a book called MY THESAURUS might contain and how in might be used.

Have students read the four words printed on the balls. Why might these words have been chosen? (They all describe what the juggler is doing with the balls.) What do the words have in common?(Their meanings are nearly the same.)

 

Contents  Ask students to look at the Contents page.  Point out its two sections.  What will we learn from page 1?  (What is a thesaurus?)

Remind students that they shared some ideas about the contents and purpose of a thesaurus.  Ask them to turn to page 1 to verify their ideas and to learn more.

 

P 1-2  Read and discuss pages 1 and 2 to discover the purpose of a thesaurus and how MY THESAURUS can help students become better writers.

Refer them back to the lower section of the Contents page. Explain that these are words they often use in their writing.   MY THESAURUS suggests other words to use instead to help make their writing more interesting.

Be sure students recognize that the words are arranged in alphabetical order.

 

P 3   Begin by directing students to the Contents page.

  • What is the first word listed in the lower section? (angry)
  • Ask students for other words that mean nearly the same as angry.  Suggest a sentence, e.g., I am angry with my sister.  Can you think of a word to use instead of angry?     
  • As students suggest words, reread the sentence substituting their words for angry.  Ask if each suggested word means angry and if it makes sense in the sentence.
  • List the words students suggest on the board or on chart paper.
  • Ask students to look at page 3 to see if any of the words they suggested are listed on the page.
  • Remind students that the words on page 3 are synonyms for the word angry.
  • To demonstrate use of the blank lines you could ask students to add any different synonyms they suggested to the page.

Make sure students connect the highlighted word (annoyed) with the illustration and the sentence at the bottom of the page.

 

P 4 Begin by directing students to the lower section of the Contents page.

  • What is the second word?  (ate)
  • Can you think of words that mean nearly the same as ate?
  • You may continue with similar instructional procedures as used with page 3.

Because the format on page 4 is different from page 3 guide students to note the differences.

  • Refer students to the second section on page 4.   What is the caption for the second set of words on this page?
  • Why do you think these words are listed on this page? 

Make sure students connect the highlighted word (nibbled) with the illustration and sentence at the bottom of the page.

 

P 5-6 Begin by directing students to the Contents page.

  • What is the third word in the lower section?  (bad)
  • Can you think of words that mean nearly the same as bad?  
  • You may continue with similar instructional procedures as used with page 3.

Because the format on these pages is different from previous pages guide students to the differences

  • Students should note that the word bad appears on two pages.
  • What else is different from the way the words were organized on pages 3 and 4?  Students should note the four categories:  a bad person, a bad place, bad food, and bad weather.
  • This is the first page with a treasure chest.  Ask students what information the treasure chest contains.  Have them turn to pages 13 and 14 to confirm their ideas.  When you are writing a story, why might it be helpful to know words that means the opposite of bad?  (In stories bad things often get better and good things sometime get worse so it is likely you will use words that mean both bad and good.)

Make sure students connect the highlighted words with the illustrations and sentences at the bottom of the pages.

 

P 7-8 You may continue with similar instructional procedures as those used with previous pages.

 

P 9-10 Begin by directing students to the 6th word in the lower section of the Contents page.

  • Ask them to name some colors they know.
  • Help them recognize that colors often have special names to describe them more precisely. (Use students’ suggestions as examples.)
  • Explore the words on pages 9 and 10 and explain that students may later discover words they will want to add to page 10.

 

P 11-36 These pages are formatted similarly to those discussed previously.  Depending on the needs of your students, you may choose to explore them with your whole class, small groups of students, or with individual students.

 

P 37-46 This section provides information about nouns, verbs, adverbs, adjectives, conjunctions, and pronoun.

  • Use the definitions and examples to explain each group of words to your students.
  • For students using MY DICTIONARY there are Information boxes on some pages that reference additional words.
  • P 38-41  Point out that the nouns are grouped into four categories that students commonly use in their writing:  people, animals, places, and things.
  • P 42 When young students write they often assume their readers understand the pronoun’s reference. Emphasize the importance of clarifying the person, animal, place, or thing the pronoun replaces.
  • P 43.  Use the examples to guide students to connect verbs and nouns. What did Ben do?  (He dangled.)  Ben is a noun; dangled is a verb.
  • P 44- 45 The sentence examples show that adjectives can make nouns more descriptive and adverbs can make verbs more descriptive.  Point out that the parallel sentences on the two pages first focus on the adjectives (p 44), then on the adverbs (p 45).
  • P 46 Conjunctions can join ideas to create more complex sentences. Guide students to recognize that text is more interesting when sentences are of varying length.

 

P 47 Students should recognize that punctuation helps a reader understand a writer’s message more clearly.

It is important that sentences end with periods, question or exclamation marks.

 

P 48, 50 Encourage students to pay attention to other punctuation marks as they read.  They know that use of a variety of words makes text more interesting.  Using a variety of punctuation adds interest too.  Ask students to consider, Why might the author have chosen that specific punctuation?  How might I use that punctuation in my own writing?

 

P 51-53 Tell students that these pages can be used to record other synonyms they find interesting and/or would like to use in their writing.